rom the Roaring Twenties to the digital age, 98-year-old Edwin Pund’s life goal of making the world a better place remains in sharp focus—despite suffering fuzzy vision from macular degeneration.

Answered request

With a twinkle in their eyes, Edwin Pund’s children tell how their father came to be. Edwin’s brother, Louis, was 9 years old at the time. With two sisters, one older and one younger, Louis went to his mother one day and said, “I want a little brother.” Frieda, a petite, deeply spiritual homemaker, turned toward her son. “Well, let’s get down on our knees right now and ask the Lord to give you a little brother,” she said. “And before you know it, whammy, there was Eddie!” His now-adult children laugh as they relate the familiar tale.

In later years, whenever the two brothers argued or fought, Edwin would always tell Louis, “I never asked to be born. It’s your fault I’m here.”

Better than money

Edwin joined the Greatest Generation on September 3, 1922, in Cooper Hospital, Camden, New Jersey, just across the Delaware River from Philadelphia. Four years before his birth, World War I had ended, and now the Roaring Twenties were underway. A feeling of optimism swept across the nation as rapid economic growth fueled the development and use of automobiles, telephones, films, radio and electrical appliances.

However, it was also an era of contrasts. Despite a thriving economy, Edwin recalls growing up in a family that had to work hard for a living. “We were very poor,” he says. “I never lacked essentials, but we couldn’t afford much. We had a garden and ate lots of vegetables. My father shot rabbits, quail and pheasants, so we had meat once in a while.”

But what the Pund family lacked financially was more than offset by the rewards of work and problem-solving. Edwin’s father, Louis Sr., taught in a high school but also loved to invent. Seeing how long it took his wife to do laundry, he designed a mechanical agitator to gently lift wash inside a modified barrel and then allow it to drop with gravity. A bicycle chain geared down to an electric motor automated the device. “By six o’clock in the morning, my mother had her laundry on the line, ready to catch the early sun!” Edwin recalls.

Lifetime gift

Shortly before Edwin’s birth, Congress ratified the 18th Amendment, banning the sale of alcohol. Despite prohibition, Philadelphia in the 1920s remained as “wet as the Atlantic Ocean” with more than 1,000 saloons staying in business.

Across the river in West Collingswood, a small town next to Camden, Edwin was insulated from the influences of the big city. “I grew up with a puritanical background. I had no temptations when I was a child,” he says. “I never even saw a policeman until I was 18!”

And yet a significant battle raged inside the young boy. Edwin remembers being very insecure in elementary school because he wasn’t a fast learner. “I felt like a loser. After school, I’d run into the house calling for my mother. I never failed to hear her voice calmly answer, ‘Edwin, I am here.’ That gave me emotional stability early in my life,” Edwin says.

Then, during class one day, a third-grade teacher played a record. As the thrilling finale to Rossini’s William Tell Overture began, the trumpet introduction riveted Edwin. “Once I heard that trumpet sound, I knew that was the instrument I wanted to play,” he says.

Shortly afterward, Edwin’s brother gave him a cornet. “Look, Eddie, this is easy,” Louis said. “There are only three valves.” Edwin held the instrument and pressed the valves. He loved it! By age 16, he was the solo cornetist in the 40-piece high school concert band. Music unlocked his spirit.

“Later I also took up playing a baritone. The fingerings are the same, but the mouthpiece is larger. It’s what I play now in my sunset years, mostly because it’s easier on my lips, but also because it’s more demanding on my breathing. That, plus clean living—I eat nutritious food and have never had coffee, alcohol or drugs—have kept me healthy.”

Making memories

The Punds worked hard, but they enjoyed life too. “I remember my father making candy canes at Christmas. He’d stretch the hot candy into long strips on a white marble slab. Then he’d twist the strips and bend the top,” Edwin says.

Several times, the family took trips across the country, trekking from New Jersey to the West Coast and back. “My father had summers off, so we headed west in our Graham-Paige. It had long running boards and an eight-cylinder engine,” Edwin says. “We took highway 30 across the northern part of the United States, went down the West Coast, and came back on highway 66.”

In those days, paved roads ended in Chicago. Heading west out of the Windy City, wheels rolled on dirt—or through mud, depending on the weather. “When it rained in Iowa, the roads were a mess. Gumbo mud up to the hubcaps. We got stuck, and a farmer plowing in the field saw us, unhitched his team of horses, came over and pulled us out,” Edwin chuckles.

He also remembers Mount Rainier in Washington state, where the family made the strenuous two-mile climb up Paradise Glacier to Camp Muir. The trip back down was much quicker. “We had rented special Tin-Pants that were canvas and waterproofed with paraffin. When we reached the top, we sat down and put our legs around the person in front. Once we were hooked together, we slid all the way down!” Edwin says.

 

Eddie and his older brother, Louis.

Eighteen-year-old Eddie in a handstand at the beach.

Tin-Pant sliding on Mt. Rainier.

Twenty-three years old at Fort Sill, Oklahoma.

He also remembers camping with the family in Yellowstone National Park. “One night, bears were overturning garbage cans, and one came around our tent. The ranger had told us they have sensitive ears, so my brother blew his cornet in the bear’s face. Sure enough, he took off,” says Edwin.

Yellowstone rangers told the family about another bear that caused trouble in the campground. After tranquilizing him, they transported the bear across the mountains and released him 40 miles away. However, by the time the rangers arrived back at the camp, there were reports of the same bear causing more problems. “He’d beelined across the mountains and beat the rangers back home!” laughs Edwin.

A life of service

After graduating from high school, Edwin went to Drexel Institute in Philadelphia to study chemistry. Then he earned a degree in aeronautical engineering at Parks Air College in Illinois. Meanwhile, another world war was brewing.

“I went into the service, joining the infantry and was transferred to the field artillery air division,” Edwin says. “I was in the American theatre the whole time, training pilots to fly.” Specifically, Edwin taught pilots to take off and land using the Brodie System. This innovative technique relied on suspended steel cables and a sling to launch and recover light aircraft above the ground. It could be used in jungles and where a runway couldn’t be set up or off the side of a ship. Click here to watch a video.

After the war, Edwin earned a teaching degree but still felt undecided about what to do. “My mother said, ‘Edwin, you still have the GI Bill. Why don’t you go to the seminary and learn the Bible like your brother did?’” Edwin recalls. “So I went to seminary and studied Hebrew and Greek. While there, I met Joyce, and we were married. When I graduated, my wife and I went to Arkansas to pastor a small church.”

Tragedy struck in 1961 when Joyce died, leaving Edwin with four children, ages 2 to 8. If that wasn’t bad enough, he lost his job with the church. It was a difficult time, but Edwin believed everything would work out, and it did. He followed in his father’s footsteps and began teaching. “Over the years, I was at many Christian and public schools, mostly on the West Coast,” he says. “I taught high school level science, band, everything. I was consciously investing my life in service.”

After Edwin’s children were grown, he felt impressed to do something for people in South Asia. Flying there, he taught in India for 10 years and then in Nepal for 10 years. “I mostly taught Bible in the original languages, but also English for students who didn’t know English well,” he says.

Last March, as the world began reacting to COVID-19, Edwin was still teaching in Nepal, despite deteriorating vision and legal blindness due to age-related macular degeneration. With the help of a travel specialist, he was able to book the last seat on the last plane out of Nepal before the airport locked down.

 

Edwin as a single parent with his kids in 1967. All five would often ride together.

Edwin teaching carpentry in Nepal.

With a century of experience in his walk of faith, Edwin doesn’t hesitate to offer advice for life:

Words of Wisdom

For young people—he believes Psalm 23:1 provides comfort and guidance. “A correct translation of the original language would read, ‘The Eternal One is continually shepherding me,’” he says. “Young people can seek, hear, know and follow the Shepherd throughout their lives.”

For people ages 20 to 65—he suggests James 1:5, which says to ask God for wisdom. “We’ve been trained to think we can make it on our own smarts. That’s a big mistake,” he says. “Ask for wisdom to meet daily challenges.”

For seniors—he turns to Ecclesiastes 8:8, which states there’s no discharge in war. “We have work to do up to the last minute in life. Continuing to use abilities in service to others prolongs life,” he says.

Time out for a vision tune-up

After returning to Seattle, Edwin finally had a chance to follow up on vision care. He was referred to Pacific Cataract and Laser Institute for cataract surgery.

“My daughter and I were very impressed with the doctors and staff—their disposition, attitude, everything was very positive. I was amazed that the procedure was absolutely pain-free. Of course, my vision is still fuzzy from macular degeneration, but now I can read on my closed-circuit TV without glasses,” he says.

Edwin’s next goal is to translate the Bible from the original languages into English more accurately than has been done to date. “With the improvement in vision after cataract surgery, my sunset years can be even more fruitful,” he says. “This will expedite the work I have left to do.”

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We specialize in cataract surgery and LASIK laser vision correction. When you entrust us with the care of your vision, our team of experts concentrates their skills on giving you the best possible outcome. Having performed over 700,000 micro eye surgeries, we have earned a reputation for world class care.

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 rom the Roaring Twenties to the digital age, 98-year-old Edwin Pund’s life goal of making the world a better place remains in sharp focus—despite suffering fuzzy vision from macular degeneration.

Answered request

With a twinkle in their eyes, Edwin Pund’s children tell how their father came to be. Edwin’s brother, Louis, was 9 years old at the time. With two sisters, one older and one younger, Louis went to his mother one day and said, “I want a little brother.” Frieda, a petite, deeply spiritual homemaker, turned toward her son. “Well, let’s get down on our knees right now and ask the Lord to give you a little brother,” she said. “And before you know it, whammy, there was Eddie!” His now-adult children laugh as they relate the familiar tale.

In later years, whenever the two brothers argued or fought, Edwin would always tell Louis, “I never asked to be born. It’s your fault I’m here.”

Better than money

Edwin joined the Greatest Generation on September 3, 1922, in Cooper Hospital, Camden, New Jersey, just across the Delaware River from Philadelphia. Four years before his birth, World War I had ended, and now the Roaring Twenties were underway. A feeling of optimism swept across the nation as rapid economic growth fueled the development and use of automobiles, telephones, films, radio and electrical appliances.

However, it was also an era of contrasts. Despite a thriving economy, Edwin recalls growing up in a family that had to work hard for a living. “We were very poor,” he says. “I never lacked essentials, but we couldn’t afford much. We had a garden and ate lots of vegetables. My father shot rabbits, quail and pheasants, so we had meat once in a while.”

But what the Pund family lacked financially was more than offset by the rewards of work and problem-solving. Edwin’s father, Louis Sr., taught in a high school but also loved to invent. Seeing how long it took his wife to do laundry, he designed a mechanical agitator to gently lift wash inside a modified barrel and then allow it to drop with gravity. A bicycle chain geared down to an electric motor automated the device. “By six o’clock in the morning, my mother had her laundry on the line, ready to catch the early sun!” Edwin recalls.

Lifetime gift

Shortly before Edwin’s birth, Congress ratified the 18th Amendment, banning the sale of alcohol. Despite prohibition, Philadelphia in the 1920s remained as “wet as the Atlantic Ocean” with more than 1,000 saloons staying in business.

Across the river in West Collingswood, a small town next to Camden, Edwin was insulated from the influences of the big city. “I grew up with a puritanical background. I had no temptations when I was a child,” he says. “I never even saw a policeman until I was 18!”

And yet a significant battle raged inside the young boy. Edwin remembers being very insecure in elementary school because he wasn’t a fast learner. “I felt like a loser. After school, I’d run into the house calling for my mother. I never failed to hear her voice calmly answer, ‘Edwin, I am here.’ That gave me emotional stability early in my life,” Edwin says.

Then, during class one day, a third-grade teacher played a record. As the thrilling finale to Rossini’s William Tell Overture began, the trumpet introduction riveted Edwin. “Once I heard that trumpet sound, I knew that was the instrument I wanted to play,” he says.

Eddie and his older brother, Louis.

Shortly afterward, Edwin’s brother gave him a cornet. “Look, Eddie, this is easy,” Louis said. “There are only three valves.” Edwin held the instrument and pressed the valves. He loved it! By age 16, he was the solo cornetist in the 40-piece high school concert band. Music unlocked his spirit.

“Later I also took up playing a baritone. The fingerings are the same, but the mouthpiece is larger. It’s what I play now in my sunset years, mostly because it’s easier on my lips, but also because it’s more demanding on my breathing. That, plus clean living—I eat nutritious food and have never had coffee, alcohol or drugs—have kept me healthy.”

Eighteen-year-old Eddie in a
handstand at the beach.

Making memories

The Punds worked hard, but they enjoyed life too. “I remember my father making candy canes at Christmas. He’d stretch the hot candy into long strips on a white marble slab. Then he’d twist the strips and bend the top,” Edwin says.

Several times, the family took trips across the country, trekking from New Jersey to the West Coast and back. “My father had summers off, so we headed west in our Graham-Paige. It had long running boards and an eight-cylinder engine,” Edwin says. “We took highway 30 across the northern part of the United States, went down the West Coast, and came back on highway 66.”

In those days, paved roads ended in Chicago. Heading west out of the Windy City, wheels rolled on dirt—or through mud, depending on the weather. “When it rained in Iowa, the roads were a mess. Gumbo mud up to the hubcaps. We got stuck, and a farmer plowing in the field saw us, unhitched his team of horses, came over and pulled us out,” Edwin chuckles.

Tin-Pant sliding on Mt. Rainier.

 

He also remembers Mount Rainier in Washington state, where the family made the strenuous two-mile climb up Paradise Glacier to Camp Muir. The trip back down was much quicker. “We had rented special Tin-Pants that were canvas and waterproofed with paraffin. When we reached the top, we sat down and put our legs around the person in front. Once we were hooked together, we slid all the way down!” Edwin says.

He also remembers camping with the family in Yellowstone National Park. “One night, bears were overturning garbage cans, and one came around our tent. The ranger had told us they have sensitive ears, so my brother blew his cornet in the bear’s face. Sure enough, he took off,” says Edwin.

Yellowstone rangers told the family about another bear that caused trouble in the campground. After tranquilizing him, they transported the bear across the mountains and released him 40 miles away. However, by the time the rangers arrived back at the camp, there were reports of the same bear causing more problems. “He’d beelined across the mountains and beat the rangers back home!” laughs Edwin.

Twenty-three years old at
Fort Sill, Oklahoma.

A life of service

After graduating from high school, Edwin went to Drexel Institute in Philadelphia to study chemistry. Then he earned a degree in aeronautical engineering at Parks Air College in Illinois. Meanwhile, another world war was brewing.

“I went into the service, joining the infantry and was transferred to the field artillery air division,” Edwin says. “I was in the American theatre the whole time, training pilots to fly.” Specifically, Edwin taught pilots to take off and land using the Brodie System. This innovative technique relied on suspended steel cables and a sling to launch and recover light aircraft above the ground. It could be used in jungles and where a runway couldn’t be set up or off the side of a ship. Click here to watch a video.

After the war, Edwin earned a teaching degree but still felt undecided about what to do. “My mother said, ‘Edwin, you still have the GI Bill. Why don’t you go to the seminary and learn the Bible like your brother did?’” Edwin recalls. “So I went to seminary and studied Hebrew and Greek. While there, I met Joyce, and we were married. When I graduated, my wife and I went to Arkansas to pastor a small church.”

Tragedy struck in 1961 when Joyce died, leaving Edwin with four children, ages 2 to 8. If that wasn’t bad enough, he lost his job with the church. It was a difficult time, but Edwin believed everything would work out, and it did. He followed in his father’s footsteps and began teaching. “Over the years, I was at many Christian and public schools, mostly on the West Coast,” he says. “I taught high school level science, band, everything. I was consciously investing my life in service.”

Edwin as a single parent with his kids in 1967.
All five would often ride together.

After Edwin’s children were grown, he felt impressed to do something for people in South Asia. Flying there, he taught in India for 10 years and then in Nepal for 10 years. “I mostly taught Bible in the original languages, but also English for students who didn’t know English well,” he says.

Last March, as the world began reacting to COVID-19, Edwin was still teaching in Nepal, despite deteriorating vision and legal blindness due to age-related macular degeneration. With the help of a travel specialist, he was able to book the last seat on the last plane out of Nepal before the airport locked down.

Time out for a vision tune-up

After returning to Seattle, Edwin finally had a chance to follow up on vision care. He was referred to Pacific Cataract and Laser Institute for cataract surgery.

“My daughter and I were very impressed with the doctors and staff—their disposition, attitude, everything was very positive. I was amazed that the procedure was absolutely pain-free. Of course, my vision is still fuzzy from macular degeneration, but now I can read on my closed-circuit TV without glasses,” he says.

Edwin’s next goal is to translate the Bible from the original languages into English more accurately than has been done to date. “With the improvement in vision after cataract surgery, my sunset years can be even more fruitful,” he says. “This will expedite the work I have left to do.”

Tragedy struck in 1961 when Joyce died, leaving Edwin with four children, ages 2 to 8. If that wasn’t bad enough, he lost his job with the church. It was a difficult time, but Edwin believed everything would work out, and it did. He followed in his father’s footsteps and began teaching. “Over the years, I was at many Christian and public schools, mostly on the West Coast,” he says. “I taught high school level science, band, everything. I was consciously investing my life in service.”

After Edwin’s children were grown, he felt impressed to do something for people in South Asia. Flying there, he taught in India for 10 years and then in Nepal for 10 years. “I mostly taught Bible in the original languages, but also English for students who didn’t know English well,” he says.

Last March, as the world began reacting to COVID-19, Edwin was still teaching in Nepal, despite deteriorating vision and legal blindness due to age-related macular degeneration. With the help of a travel specialist, he was able to book the last seat on the last plane out of Nepal before the airport locked down.

Edwin teaching carpentry in Nepal.

Words of Wisdom

With a century of experience in his walk of faith, Edwin doesn’t hesitate to offer advice for life:

For young peoplehe believes Psalm 23:1 provides comfort and guidance. “A correct translation of the original language would read, ‘The Eternal One is continually shepherding me,’” he says. “Young people can seek, hear, know and follow the Shepherd throughout their lives.”

For people ages 20 to 65he suggests James 1:5, which says to ask God for wisdom. “We’ve been trained to think we can make it on our own smarts. That’s a big mistake,” he says. “Ask for wisdom to meet daily challenges.”

For seniorshe turns to Ecclesiastes 8:8, which states there’s no discharge in war. “We have work to do up to the last minute in life. Continuing to use abilities in service to others prolongs life,” he says.